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Jack Reddish

Hall of Fame Class of 1969

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At age fourteen, Jack Reddish became the youngest competitor to jump at the famous Ecker Hill. He went on to become America’s pre-eminent alpine racer of the immediate post World War Two period.

Jack Reddish, also known as Red Dog, was born in Salt Lake City, Utah on December 2, 1926. He began to ski in 1933 and was a member of Alta Ski Club. Jack was the “Boy Wonder” skier and winner of almost every intermountain and national award offered as well as several from the European continent. A four-way competitor during his long racing career, he was an excellent example for the youngsters of the era to emulate.

At age fourteen, while representing the Alta Ski Club, he became the youngest competitor to ever jump at the famed Ecker Hill where he won the National Ski Association Class “B” title in 1942. Jack was the 1940 Intermountain Slalom Champion and the 1940-1945 Intermountain Class “C” Jumping Champion, won the Alta Cup in 1945, was the 1947 Bradley Plate four-way winner and took a 1st place in the 1947 Olympic Downhill tryouts.

Jack won the National Ski Association Downhill title and the National Ski Association Slalom and Combined titles in 1948, 1950 and 1952. The high point in his career, however, was placing 7th in the slalom at the 1948 Winter Olympic Games at St. Moritz, Switzerland – the best any American man had done in this event to that date. In 1949 he won the Harriman Cup. Jack Reddish’s race record is considered among the greatest in the history of North America.

After his retirement, Jack Reddish moved to the Los Angeles area where he and his wife, Paula, raised three children. He is probably better known for his second career of movie director of films of such note as “Bonnie and Clyde”, “the Thomas Crown Affair” and “Bullit”.

Jack Reddish was elected to the U.S. National Ski Hall of Fame in 1969.

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